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HOUSE CHURCH QUESTIONS (based on the Message for Sunday, February 17)

The Book of Ecclesiastes is part of the Bible’s Wisdom Literature, a collection of writings focused on conveying wisdom and knowledge to God’s people. Written by Qoholeth, which can be translated as “Teacher” or “Preacher”, the author is traditionally interpreted to be Solomon, son of David, around 10th Century B.C.

Ecclesiastes is known for its unique and provocative language which presents many key themes, including that 1) the world is profoundly broken since the Fall, and 2) true value is found in fearing (or revering) God.

Scripture Reading: Ecclesiastes 5:8-20

•What is one verse or idea that jumps out at you as you read this passage? Does it connect with a recent life situation, or what kind of meaning does it have for you at this time?

•There are over 2000 verses in the Bible which deal directly with the topic of money and possessions. In fact, Jesus taught more about the pitfalls of money (or the love of it) than almost any other topic. Why do you think this is such an uneasy topic for many of us to discuss?

•Verse 5 says, “As goods increase, so do those who consume them.” In other words, accumulating wealth draws a crowd. Do you think “mob mentality” affects how we view money? Why or why not?

•Most of us can probably identify with Tevye, the hero of the classic musical, Fiddler on the Roof. When confronted with, “Money is the world’s curse,” he’s quick with a reply: “May the Lord smite me with it!” Do you ever feel conflicted over your mutual love and hate of money? Discuss.

•Those who struggle with problematic gambling addiction also tend to chronically struggle with the false belief that they are only one win away from all their problems disappearing. Have you ever fallen victim to this way of thinking? Why do you think this is such a powerful deception? What do you think the impact might be on how society views or helps those in poverty? (see verse 8 again)

•Read Mark 10:17-22. What’s one way as a group we can challenge each other to view our personal finances through “Kingdom eyes?”

HOUSE CHURCH QUESTIONS (based on the Message for Sunday, February 3)

The Book of Ecclesiastes is part of the Bible’s Wisdom Literature, a collection of writings focused on conveying wisdom and knowledge to God’s people. Written by Qoholeth, which can be translated as “Teacher” or “Preacher”, the author is traditionally interpreted to be Solomon, son of David, around 10th Century B.C. Ecclesiastes is known for its unique and provocative language which presents many key themes, including that 1) the world is profoundly broken since the Fall, and 2) true value is found in fearing (or revering) God

Scripture Reading: Ecclesiastes 5:1-7

•What is one verse or idea that jumps out at you as you read this passage? Does it connect with a recent life situation, or what kind of meaning does it have for you at this time?

•What do you think it means to “offer the sacrifice of fools”? Why do you think the Preacher is concerned about it?

•Let your words be few; what are some ways in which our society or culture today encourages the opposite? What might be some costs to this?

•The Bible is full of stories of God’s promises to His people. Have you ever made a promise to God? Did you approach it slowly and thoughtfully, or did you jump right in, perhaps too hastily? What was the outcome?

•What is one thing you’re newly committing to this week, and what is your prayer that goes along with it?

HOUSE CHURCH QUESTIONS (based on the Message for Sunday, January 27)

The Book of Ecclesiastes is part of the Bible’s Wisdom Literature, a collection of writings focused on conveying wisdom and knowledge to God’s people. Written by Qoholeth , which can be translated as “Teacher” or “Preacher”, the author is traditionally interpreted to be Solomon, son of David, around 10th Century B.C. Ecclesiastes is known for its unique and provocative language which presents many key themes, including that 1) the world is profoundly broken since the Fall, and 2) true value is found in fearing (or revering) God

Scripture Reading: Ecclesiastes 4:1-12

● What is one verse or idea that jumps out at you as you read this passage? Does it connect with a recent life situation, or what kind of meaning does it have for you at this time?

● Verses 1-3 speak to the extent of the suffering that some (most?) of us experience in this earthly life at one point or another. Why do you think this is an important passage for Christians to wrestle with?

● Verse 6 says, “Better one handful with tranquility, than two handfuls with toil and chasing after the wind.” What do you think this means? Why is the Preacher advocating that tranquility (or quietness) is more valuable than work? Why might this be a difficult truth for us to accept?

● What are some personal practices you use to connect with God when you suffer injustice, when you feel disconnected, or when you feel lonely? What are some things that might get in the way of using them? What are some things God has spoken to you when you have been able to push through?

● Read verses 9-10 again out loud. Take some time to pray for those you know who are currently suffering. What is one way you might reach out to them this week to “help the other up”?

HOUSE CHURCH QUESTIONS (based on the Message for Sunday, January 20)

The Book of Ecclesiastes is part of the Bible’s Wisdom Literature, a collection of writings focused on conveying wisdom and knowledge to God’s people. Written by Qoholeth, which can be translated as “Teacher” or “Preacher”, the author is traditionally interpreted to be Solomon, son of David, around 10th Century B.C.

Ecclesiastes is known for its unique and provocative language which presents many key themes, including that 1) the world is profoundly broken since the Fall, and 2) true value is found in fearing (or revering) God.

Scripture Reading: Ecclesiastes 3:1-22

What do you think are some key themes or messages of this reading? How might they apply to your life today?

Verse 11 says “He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.”
What do you think this means?

Why would God make it so that we should desire something (set something in our heart) that is unattainable (no one can fathom)?

Why do you think God gives us more questions than outright answers in life?

How do verses 12-14 speak to finding meaning when all is said to be meaningless?

What is your prayer this week as you reflect on this passage?

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